DOCTOR WHO Wins A Peabody Award

George Foster Peabody Awards

And why the hell not?

Here’s what the Peabody Awards Committee had to say:

Doctor Who (BBC America)

The BBC Cymru Wales

Seemingly immortal, 50-years-old and still running, this engaging, imaginative sci-fi/fantasy series is awarded an Institutional Peabody for evolving with technology and the times like nothing else in the known television universe.

In case you don’t know about the George Foster Peabody Awards, they’re a Very Big Deal. Here’s how their website puts it, and it’s being modest:

First presented in 1941, the George Foster Peabody Awards recognize distinguished achievement and meritorious service by broadcasters, cable and Webcasters, producing organizations, and individuals…

Selection is made each spring by the Peabody Board, a 16-member panel of distinguished academics, television critics, industry practitioners and experts in culture and the arts…

The competition is open to entries produced for alternative distribution, including corporate, educational, home-video release, CD-ROM and World Wide Web. In general, such non-broadcast or non-cable entries should be publicly available.

Other scripted winners 0f the 72nd Awards include:

Southland (TNT)

John Wells Production in association with Warner Bros Television

Shot on location in Los Angeles neighborhoods both posh and blighted, focusing on characters whose personalities have become more nuanced by the season, it’s a gritty, weekly ride-along, as convincing as cop drama gets.

Switched at Birth (ABC Family)

Prodco, Inc. in association with ABC Family

What could be a reality-show premise – two families discovering their teenage daughters, one of whom is deaf, were switched at birth – is explored with honesty, imagination and humor in this superior family series.

Game Change (HBO)

Playtone Productions and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

A behind-the-scenes account of what happened after John McCain picked Alaska’s charismatic, combative governor to be his running mate, it’s a story worthy of Euripides and Robert Ripley.

Louie (FX)

Pig Newton, Inc., FX Productions

Louis C.K.’s self-reflective, shape-shifting series about a single, show-biz dad is daring and endearing, scandalous and sensitive, a milestone of comedic reach and candor.


Girls (HBO)

Aptow Prod and I am Jenni Konner Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

Creator/star Lena Dunham’s singular, decidedly unglamorous take on sex and the single girl and the city reverberates with anxiety, angst, insight and rueful humor.\

See the full list.

Sitcom Showrunners Expound on the Future

…And they sure as hell know a lot more than most TV execs!

The Future of Sitcoms According to the Creators of ‘Parks and Rec,’ ‘Enlightened,’ ‘Don’t Trust the B—’ and ‘Raising Hope’ – by Alison Willmore

Greg Garcia (the creator and executive producer of Fox’s “Raising Hope”), Nahnatchka Khan (the creator and executive producer of ABC’s “Don’t Trust the B— in Apartment 23”), Michael Schur (the co-creator of NBC’s “Parks and Recreation”) and Mike White (the co-creator, co-star and executive producer of HBO’s “Enlightened”) gathered in Manhattan this past weekend for a New Yorker Festival event entitled “The Future of Sitcoms.” While the panel did not, as jokingly promised by moderator Emily Nussbaum, the magazine’s TV critic, come up with a plan for the next stage of comedy during its 90-minute run, it did cover some very interesting ground about how sitcoms are evolving in a way that may be quieter but is no less significant than what’s happening with dramas. Here are some highlights from the event:

Storytelling is getting more sophisticated. When working on his 2004 Fox series “Cracking Up,” the single-camera aesthetic was “still in its infancy,” according to Mike White, and “networks were extremely prescriptive about how it should look and feel.” White said he feels it’s since changed and opened up considerably. That said, it doesn’t mean that everyone’s ready to come along for the ride — as Garcia pointed out, “the shows that get the biggest ratings aren’t doing anything new” and that the definition for success is “what will make the most money for networks in syndication.” But Khan was hopeful, saying that what’s important is that these ideas are “percolating” and that “change takes time” — “what’s considered a hit now” is different, she said.

Everyone’s in awe of “Louie.” Louis C.K.’s FX show was brought up several times as something to admire. “Among writers, that’s the number one thing we talk about,” said Schur, while Khan called out the episode “Dad,” in which a long sequence was dedicated to Louie running away from his father, as “fantastic to me” — “It’s so raw. I find it refreshing. For me, that’s hopefully where comedy is going.” But they admitted the show wasn’t for everyone, and that it wasn’t something everyone could pull off. Garcia acknowledged that “some members of the audience could find it offputting,” and Schur cautioned about claiming the show heralds a new era: “To do what he does, you have to be as funny as Louis C.K. — and that narrows the field down to one person… It’s hasty to say everything’s different because of Louis C.K.”

Read it all

LOUIE is Taking a Break to Rest on its Laurels

…and, according to Louis C.K., recharge after the exhaustion of producing-writing-directing all those short little episodes that won LCK all those Emmy noms and the Big Statue itself for Best Comedy Writing.

Looks like LCK’s a little stressed out by his recent success. According to Jon Weisman on Variety.Com:

“The last three seasons have been this surge of fun and work and stories and it’s been great, but I want the show to keep getting better,” C.K. said in a conference call with reporters today. “That’s my goal, and I don’t want it to be making the donuts, I want it to be something that comes from somewhere important and stays funny. It’s a luxury I asked for … season four is my job right now, but I’m going to take a whole lot of time to turn it in.

“I want season four to go somewhere new, even if it’s only a slight shift….”

“You have to live as an artist in order to grow and recharge your batteries, and sometimes there’s not enough time to live when you have a really successful show.”

C.K. said that he’s “eager” to get back on the air but that the desire to make the show better superceded that, though he realized he was putting more pressure on himself to deliver.

Fair enuff, dood. Seeya in ’14, fresh as a daisy, bright, original and funny. (Ha! You thought we were going to go off on him, didn’t you? Actually, so did we…except we couldn’t find anything to go off about. Anybody got some smut about Louis?)

The TV Academy Gave Out Some Emmys The Other Night

…but we just couldn’t work up enough interest to watch. No, wait, we don’t mean that. We mean that we’re against the idea of artists being regarded as competing for things like awards. Competing for jobs, sure, but awards?  That’s soo uncreative. Anyway here are all the winners. The ones we care about, that is:

Hmm, this dude isn’t writing so he must be singing

Writing for a Comedy Series
Louis C.K.: LOUIE: Pregnant

Writing for a Variety Special
Louis C.K.: Live at the Beacon Theatre, Louis C.K.

Writing for a Drama Series
Alex Gansa, Howard Gordon & Gideon Raff: HOMELAND

Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special?
Danny Strong: GAME CHANGE

Our congratulations all these fine writers. You’ve earned our praise, our support, and our envy!

TVLine Comedy Writing Emmy Poll

Nope, don’t know where the Drama Writing Poll is but hope it shows up soon

TVLine has a poll asking the wonderful – for writers – question:

Emmys 2012: What Should Win Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series? – by Michael Slezak

We’ve reached the episode-specific portion of our “Who Should Win” Emmy poll series, so it’s time to hit the rewind button on your internal DVRs to ensure a fully informed voting process. Today, we’re taking a closer look at the race for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series. That statuette has gone to writers from Modern Family for two years running, but is certain to change hands in 2012, as the ABC smash was left off the list of nominees in favor of some upstart critical darlings…

What would you do if you had the power to honor one of these fine episodes when the Emmys are handed out in September? Choose your favorite in our poll below — TVLine voting closes Sept. 14, so act now! — then hit the comments to justify your pick!

What Should Win Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series? Community: “Remedial Chaos Theory” Girls: “Pilot” Louie: “Pregnant” Parks And Recreation: “The Debate” Parks And Recreation: “Win, Lose, Or Draw”

Read it all and vote here

Taking advantage of this unusual opportunity (someone caring about our writing preference), we voted for LOUIE “Pregnant.” What about you?