HOW TO WRITE A DRAMEDY SCRIPT: THE SECRET SAUCE TO GREATNESS

Our buds at Script Reader Pro have come up with another winner. This “secret sauce” is just what you need to make you the Dramedy Writing Chef of Chefs.

(Sorry to beat the metaphor to death. Sometimes we just can’t help ourselves.)

read article

Behind The Scenes Of WandaVision And How It Was Actually Made

Woah! Another terrifically educational video, this time about the making of one of our favorite new shows, the mighty WandaVision. And guess how we learned about it. Right, via TVWriter™’s very own Writing & Showbiz News page, updated every 2 hours 24/7 at https://tvwriter.com/writing-tv-news/.

More of this kind of cool stuff at (no, we’re not plugging TVWriter™ Writing &Showbiz News again, un-uh. We’re plugging) The Things YouTube Channel. Check it out.

Larry Brody’s TV Writing Tips & Tricks #19 – One-Hour Teleplay Construction

by Larry Brody

Looking for more detailed info on TV Writing? Then this is for you!

Over the years certain types of story construction have proven to work more effectively than others on TV. By “effective” I mean that series that plot their stories this way have gotten consistently higher ratings than others, and during the usual course of an episode fewer viewers have gone surfing away.

For one-hour shows, start with a Teaser that illustrates the premise of the episode. Make sure it shows us this week’s central problem. And make sure it really does “tease” us by ending on a note of tension – with danger (physical or psychological) either impending or rearing its fascinating head. read article

“I’ve written less in the last year than I have my entire career.”

Time now for a few words about our ongoing lockdown. Some people were sure it would be a  major benefit to TV and screenwriters. How’s that working for us so far?

Despite Solitude, Lockdown Wasn’t A Creative Boon for Screenwriters
by Bryn Sandberg

Writing was the rare Hollywood vocation that never had to shut down, but A-list scribes including Damon Lindelof and Courtney Kemp describe a different reality: “I’ve written less in the last year than I have my entire career.” read article

Larry Brody’s TV Writing Tips & Tricks #18 – Does Your Dialog Pass the Morning After Test?

by Larry Brody

Looking for more detailed info on TV Writing? Then this is for you!

One of the paradoxes of television writing is that although story is king, writers in television are judged by their dialog.

That’s because the plots for each series episode are usually constructed by the entire staff, with input from the stars, stunt co-ordinators, network personnel, and various assistants as well. read article