Larry Brody’s TV Writing Tips & Tricks #23 – How Not To Write a Script That Sells. Or Even works.

by Larry Brody

Looking for more detailed info on TV Writing? Then this is for you!

Now, because even though most of you have NOT asked for it – in spite of the face that all of you need it, here’s my take on:

HOW NOT TO WRITE A SCRIPT read article

Writers vs. Execs Dept: Saying No to Free Leavebehinds

The current discussion regarding free leavebehinds is one of the most contentious TV and film writing issues of our time. The Writers Guild of America West is dead against it. In the following video, several top writers do their best to clarify why.

More WGAW Videos for all our edification

Larry Brody’s TV Writing Tips & Tricks #22 – Energy Sells

by Larry Brody

Looking for more detailed info on TV Writing? Then this is for you!

In an era where screenwriting courses are rampant, available at your local adult school, junior college, university, vocational school, you-name-it, it’s easy to throw yourself into the study of format and technique.

TV Writer.Com, for example, is bombarded daily with questions about the “best” way to show scene transitions, the “most effective” way to write an action scene, and the “most subtle” way to “imply” rather than “state” a new shot. read article

How I Hijacked Hollywood or: How To Sell A Screenplay

This clever tale of Imposter Syndrome in action (hey, we’ve ALL got it so what the heck) is packed with wisdom and attitude, and as regular TVWriter™ visitors know, we’re hardcore admirers of both.

by Zack Ford

On a hot spring day in 2013, I exited the Kips Bay brownstone in Manhattan where I lived in a rent-controlled studio apartment with my girlfriend and a white cat, walked west to 5th Avenue and then south to 23rd Street, to one of the few remaining Radio Shacks in history. Here, I bought an item just as outré as the store itself: an answering machine for a landline telephone. I had a plan to hack Hollywood. read article

Larry Brody’s TV Writing Tips & Tricks #21 – Show Don’t Tell

by Larry Brody

Looking for more detailed info on TV Writing? Then this is for you!

I’ve probably said this before, but since it’s THE most important aspect of writing for films and television it can’t hurt to say it again. SHOW what happens, don’t just tell about it.

This means that whenever possible the audience should see key events occurring onscreen. Don’t have Doctor Who gathering her companions together and telling them they have to save London from a new alien enemy. Instead, show her discovering the problem.. read article