WGAW ANNOUNCES 2022 OFFICER & BOARD CANDIDATES

Whether or not you’re a member of the WGAW or WGAE, this news is important to you if you write or plan to write for TV or films. It’s the officers and Board who set and maintain policy that effects every aspect of electronic media. In other words, it behooves most if not all of the writers who come to TVWriter™ to read this ASAP.

WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA WEST ANNOUNCES CANDIDATES FOR 2022 OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS ELECTION
via WGAW

Writers Guild of America West’s Nominating Committee has announced the initial list of candidates for the 2022 WGAW Board of Directors election. read article

How to Create Your Perfect Writing Environment

Our friends at Porch.Com want very much for all of us to know this, and guess what? So do all of us at TVWriter™.

by Teresa Siqueira

Whether you’re a long-time writer or just beginning to explore the possibilities of a writing career or hobby, you’ll need to create a writing environment that’s conducive to getting work done. You can transform a nook or room of your home into your ideal writing environment. With a comfortable space and a strong work ethic, you can build upon your writing skills and begin to accomplish your goals. Use the following tips to design your perfect writing space. read article

LB: “Retirement Blues?”

by Larry Brody

I’m thinking that the heading on this post could also apply to this cartoon by Wiley:

Don’t get me wrong. It doesn’t apply to me, oh no, no. read article

Literary Devices Every Writer Should Know

Another infographic from one of my favorite sources,  Grammarcheck.Net boss lady Jennifer Frost. This time around it’s all about my high school English teacher’s favorite subject – literary devices.

Who knows? Maybe I might have understood what he was talking about if he’d illustrated it like this.

read article

LB: Yo, Novelists! Think Publishing via Kindle has Freed You?

by Larry Brody

Are you one of the many authors proudly self-publishing on Kindle? Merrily celebrating having cast aside the shackles of the big publishing houses and their creative, or maybe not-so-creative, demands?

It may behoove you to think again. Here’s how Parul Sehgal put it in The New Yorker for newyorker.com on October 25th: read article