Has Your Writing Been Rejected? (And Whose Hasn’t?) 3 Methods for Coping

the_scream____ing_cat
The Scream… ing cat
by ~tayek543

by the Gotham Writers Workshop

Rejection is part of a writer’s life. Anyone who wants to make it as a writer needs to learn to face rejection bravely, gracefully, and frequently.

Three tips for coping with rejection:

Laugh at your rejections.
Learn from your rejections.
Always have a new project underway, something that will give you hope no matter how many rejections come your way for the previous project.
You may take some consolation in knowing the rejection history of these writers and works:

Dune by Frank Herbert – 13 rejections

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone – 14 rejections

Auntie Mame by Patrick Dennis – 17 rejections

Jonathan Livingston Seagull – 18 rejections

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle – 29 rejections

Carrie by Stephen King – over 30 rejections

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell – 38 rejections

A Time to Kill by John Grisham – 45 rejections

Louis L’Amour, author of over 100 western novels – over 300 rejections before publishing his first book

John Creasy, author of 564 mystery novels – 743 rejections before publishing his first book

Ray Bradbury, author of over 100 science fiction novels and stories – around 800 rejections before selling his first story

The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter – rejected so universally the author decided to self-publish the book

From rejection slip for George Orwell’s Animal Farm:

“It is impossible to sell animal stories in the U.S.A.”

From rejection slip for Norman MacLean’s A River Runs Through It:

“These stories have trees in them.”

From rejection slip for article sent to the San Francisco Examiner to Rudyard Kipling:

“I’m sorry, Mr. Kipling, but you just don’t know how to use the English language.”

From rejection slip for The Diary of Anne Frank:

“The girl doesn’t, it seems to me, have a special perception or feeling which would lift that book above the curiosity level.”

Rejection slip for Dr. Seuss’s And To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street:

“Too different from other juveniles on the market to warrant its selling.”

Rejection from a Chinese economic journal:

“We have read your manuscript with boundless delight. If we were to publish your paper, it would be impossible for us to publish any work of lower standard. And as it is unthinkable that in the next thousand years we shall see its equal, we are, to our regret, compelled to return your divine composition, and to beg you a thousand times to overlook our short sight and timidity.”

Matt Smith Enters the Real World of Showbiz

Whoa! Dood’s doing the Hollywood thing.

Well, semi-Indie anyway:

matt-smith

Matt Smith Wants To Catch A Monster…Probably not while sporting a fez
by James White  (EmpireOnline.Com)

He’s dallied with Daleks, curtailed the Cybermen’s plans and wrangled the Weeping Angels, so it somehow makes sense that Matt Smith – currently better known as The Doctor – would be recruited for Ryan Gosling’s first stab at directing, How To Catch A Monster.

Gosling has been working up to calling the shots for a while now, and has written a blend of fantasy, noir and suspense that will unspool a tale of a mother (Christina Hendricks) on a mission.

Against the surreal dreamscape of a vanishing city, it finds Billy (Hendricks), a single mother of two who usually works in a fetish club, swept into a dark fantasy underworld. While that’s happening, her teenaged son finds a secret road leading into an underwater town. Mother and son must figure out various mysteries if they want to keep their family alive.

Smith, who will make his US film debut with the movie, is on to play the male lead, though what that entails is still a mystery. He’s joining a cast that also includes Ben Mendelsohn and Eva Mendes.

What this really means is we have the image of Gosling watching several episodes of Doctor Who to decide whether he should cast Smith, and that, we have to admit, makes us grin like fools. Let’s all start a rumour that he’s a huge fan and wants to guest star! In any case, the Monster cameras should be cranking this spring.

Do Not be One with THE FOLLOWING

So spaketh The Hudsonian! Here’s why:

The-Following-Castby The Hudsonian

I heart Kevin Williamson.

Williamson is the brain behind my favorite “horror” movie (Scream); everyone’s favorite rural town near a river (Dawson’s Creek); and one of my favorite shows currently on television (The Vampire Diaries).

He’s also the brainchild behind the mind-numbingly monotonous plague on FOX titled The Following.

This review could be as simple as one repetitive letter: Zzzzzzzzzzz.

Yes, a snooze fest. For something that is supposed to be a member of this newfound television “horror” genre, it pales in comparison to everything. (I’ve never actually seen American Horror Story, and I know reviews are mixed, but I can’t imagine it’s any worse than this.)

A captured serial killer with an obsession for all things Edgar Allen Poe escapes from jail. He was put there after a string of artistic murders and was caught as his attempt at a fifteenth failed. His capturer, Detective Ryan Hardy – played by Kevin Bacon, who has been separated by six degrees of emotional reactions – is a retired FBI agent with a drinking problem. He’s brought back into the fold when Joe Carroll, the serial killer, escapes from prison.

They spend much of the episode trying to track him down, put together the puzzle pieces, blah, blah, blah. He finishes his failed kill (poor Sarah Fuller), and is promptly captured. The twist? He’s kind of a prophet of sorts to a large Internet following – Does the name make sense now? – who now do his dirty work for him while he sits in jail and toys with the emotions of Detective Hardy.

I feel like I’ve seen this before. There was a similar storyline written into an old CBS show, Moonlight, but instead of a few episodes, Williamson made a whole series about it. The scary moments aren’t scary; the drama isn’t dramatic; and the score fails to provide the necessary feel to extract any meaningful emotion.

I want this lost hour of my life back.

Oh, and I want the real Kevin Williamson to make a good horror show. Thanks.

This Could Be TVWriter™’s Favorite Title in the History of Literature

Just sayin’:

Hollywood_Hell_Novel

It’s from the legendary paperback series The Executioner and is still in print and available. Our faith in humanity is restored! (Well, almost. Pretty close anyway.)

Looking for TV Scripts from U.S. Sitcoms?

A few days ago we showed where to get your drama script fix. Now it’s time for some comedies:

30Rock script

Click the Pic & Ye shall Find! (Alert – this collection isn’t as complete as the Drama collection…sorry)