PJ McIlvaine: The Best Laid Plans…

Ms McIlvaine relaxing in her domain

by PJ McIlvaine

As I sit here, coughing, hacking, and sneezing, with my nose a continual fountain of snot and mucus, I had started off January with such high hopes. I always do…until reality bites me in the butt.

2018 ended with a bang. In late November, my husband had major surgery. It was quite unexpected, and the surgeon was candid in what could go wrong. Maybe too candid, which only added to our fear, worry, and confusion. Thankfully, husband sailed through it, and is now pretty much back to normal.

What is not back to normal is my writing routine.

I’m the type who has always blustered through. I’ve written though anything: hurricane, stomach flu, sinus, moving, kids puking, and various other travails. I always prided myself on my strength and stamina. I wrote 365 days of the year, come hell or high water.

But I have to be honest….November was pretty much a washout…and having my sinus/cold flare up just as I picked up hubby from the hospital meant another week or so of feeling lousy. Yes, I was writing, but it was a real slog. I was from from the “zone”, where I write on auto-pilot.

Then, December, well, that was pretty much a wash, what with the holidays and hubby still recovering, and kiddies being sick here and there. I don’t think there was one week where one of the older grand kids wasn’t home with something (or one of the grand babies was running snot like lava).

But January, which also happens to be my birth month. I always start out with high hopes and good intentions. This was going to be the year!

Until the grand babies came down with an awful cold/grippe…then my husband…and then me, and of course, I had it worst of all. No appetite, no sense of smell or taste, and no energy. In one week I went through six tissue boxes.

The last couple of January’s have been like that. Awful flu, stomach virus, sinus, cold, grippe…the germs find me and don’t let go. I don’t know if it’s because of the change of season or that as I get older I’m more susceptible to disease and infection, but man, I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired.

And as sick and as miserable as I was, I still wrote. Sure, not as much as I’d like to ideally, but even when I wasn’t physically writing, mentally, I never stopped.

I got off queries.

I wrote down ideas.

I sent off requested material.

In my head, I continued to plot out the three novels I’m currently writing.

I gave notes.

And I still wrote, even if it didn’t seem I was making progress.

So yeah, even though there were days I felt like going to bed and pulling the blanket over my head, I still trudged on.

Which leads me to my next train of thought…

Rejection.

It sucks.

I mean, REALLY SUCKS.

It’s one thing to get generic, form, bland passes. I tell myself, just one more no until I get a yes. I don’t dwell on them.

But when you get a pass that is just so lovely, so complimentary, so very close to a yes but is still a no, no matter how many times you read it, you’re gutted like a filet of fish. No matter how long you’ve been doing this, it still hurts like hell, and no amount of cookies and cream ice cream is going to make you feel better.

I know many writers who obsess over passes…who try to read in-between the lines, the subtext, what did they really mean, or not mean.

In the end, it doesn’t matter.

A pass is a pass, no matter how nicely it was worded.

And as much as it hurts, you must remain professional. I repeat, YOU MUST REMAIN PROFESSIONAL.

You can’t write the agent back and say boo-hoo, they’re missing out on the next great fill in the blank.

You can’t threaten.

You can’t cajole.

You have to grin and bear it, and move on. I can’t stress that enough. Don’t be the nitwit who is castigated on social media for being a jerk.

It’s a business. Opinions differ.

Many writers who went on to become great writers were all rejected at one point.

JK Rowling.

Stephen King.

John Cleese. (Fawlty Towers was rejected. Fawlty Towers!)

What I’m trying to say is that rejection is normal. You can’t expect everyone to “like” what you do or to “get” it.

As I am fond of saying, it only takes one yes.

I don’t need ten.

Just one. (As I reach for another box of tissues with watery eyes).


Pj McIlvaine is a prolific writer/author/screenwriter/writer/journalist. She has been published in The New York Times, Newsday, and a host of other places. Her Showtime movie, My Horrible Year (with Mimi Rogers, Karen Allen and Eric Stoltz) was nominated for a Daytime Emmy. Find out more about Ms. McIlvaine HERE. This article first in her most magical blog.

The Good Side of TV, Film, etc. “Piracy”

What? You didn’t know that there was a good side to unauthorized posting of certain intellectual property? Neither did we. Which is why, now that we’ve seen this article, we believe it’s important to pass it along:

Tolerating Piracy Can Benefit Consumers, Creators and Retailers, Research Finds
by Ernesto

New research suggests that turning a blind eye to piracy can benefit consumers, creators and retailers, all at the same time. This win-win-win situation has a positive effect on the economy at large. Using Game of Thrones as an example, the researchers conclude that tolerating piracy to a certain degree can be a wise decision.

Over the past decade, various entertainment industry groups have lobbied hard for tougher anti-piracy measures.

The harder it is for people to download something through unofficial channels, the more revenue will flow to the creators, the argument goes.

However, a new study by Indiana University researcher Antino Kim conducted together with colleagues from the University of Texas-Dallas and the University of Washington, suggests that this is not always the case.

The findings from their economic impact model are published in the latest edition of the MIS Quarterly Journal, in an article titled  “The ‘Invisible Hand’ of Piracy: An Economic Analysis of the Information-Goods Supply Chain.”

According to their analysis, piracy limits the pricing power of both the creator and the retailer. This reduces the impact of double marginalization, which occurs when creators and retailers both add significantly to the price of a product.

Because piracy is seen as a form of “shadow competition” the price of a product, such as an HBO cable subscription, is pushed closer to the economic optimum. At that optimal price point, everyone is better off, including the broader economy.

“When information goods are sold to consumers via a retailer, in certain situations, a moderate level of piracy seems to have a surprisingly positive impact on the profits of the manufacturer and the retailer while, at the same time, enhancing consumer welfare,” Kim and his co-authors write.

“Such a win-win-win situation is not only good for the supply chain but is also beneficial for the overall economy,” they add….

Read it all at TORRENTFREAK.COM

It’s Quentin Tarantino Week at TVWriter™ Part 4

Not Mr. Tarantino hisself but a very close up and personal friend

Previously on TVWriter™’s Quentin Tarantino week

Previously but not as previously as the above previous video

Previously as in yesterday for Quentin baby’s week

Today’s our last video honoring Harvey Weinstein’s bud, QT. Not an interview but an actual sample of one of his least known works…and unusual in that it was suitable for TV:

NOTE FROM LB: Hold on, gang. I think we’ve got a problem here. Have you checked out this clip at Snopes?

MINION’S NOTE: What? Whatchatalkin’about? Oh…oh…oh crap, boss. That wasn’t really written by Our Hero, was it?

ANOTHEr MINION NOTE: Sorry, folks, looks like we got snookered. Not Snopes but IMDB, the Universe’s Highest Authority On Things That Matter to TVWriter™ And Our Visitors says the writer of this episode wasn’t His Sacred Highness QT but Travis Bowe, one of Seth MacFarlane’s ultra-talented go-to writers. But, hey, he really nailed that Tarantino magic, yeah? Nice goin’ Travis!

Hmm, who should we here at TVWriter™ honor next? Suggestions anyone?

Why Structure Is so Important In Your Writing

We hear at TVWriter™ are big fans of Lucy V Hay, so we can think of nothing better to help us wrap up another work week (it is Friday today, yeah?) than to present the following video, with which we agree mightily:

Found on the Bang2write Youtube Channel

Visit Ms. Hay’s blog (you definitely won’t regret it)

It’s Quentin Tarantino Week at TVWriter™ Part 3

Previously on TVWriter™’s Quentin Tarantino week

Previously but not as previously as the above previous video

…And, we’re back with Part 3, in which Our Hero shows us all what he’s really made of…and more importantly, explains how our favorite of his films came to be (For reals.):

Yeppers, gang, more tomorrow!