Kelly Jo Brick: The Write Path With SUPERNATURAL’S Davy Perez, Part 2

A series of interviews with hard-working writers – by another hard-working writer!

by Kelly Jo Brick

Aspiring writers often wonder how the pros got where they are. The truth is, everyone’s story is different, but there are some common elements: dedication, persistence, hard work and not giving up.

Persistence and positive attitude were major influences in the development of Davy Perez’s career in entertainment. Born and raised in East LA, Davy became involved with a sketch group and worked as a background actor before following his creative passions as a writer. Acceptance into multiple writing programs helped lead the way to him becoming a staff writer for the highly acclaimed TV show AMERICAN CRIME. He now writes for the CW series, SUPERNATURAL.

HOW DID YOU GET THE WRITING JOB ON AMERICAN CRIME?

One of the executives I met with who had a producing deal was Michael McDonald. I went in to his office for a general meeting and he was in pilot production of AMERICAN CRIME. We talked about the script and talked about my own upbringing and when I was a teenager and getting into trouble. They had a character on the show that was going to go through this arc. He was kind of like; you’re very close to the character in a lot of ways. He was also tickled by the fact that we knew each other, you used to get coffee and now you’re here and that’s fantastic. He said, “You should meet John Ridley, I think he’d really like your story.”

I met John and that’s how I got staffed on AMERICAN CRIME. For that to be the first show that I got to work on was a huge blessing, because we were trying to be socially conscious, and also the level of work that I was surrounded by, the people I was surrounded by, from the cast to the crew to writing. I was very humbled and am still humbled to be able to say this was the company I was part of. That job wasn’t just a job, it was the beginning of my career.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR FIRST TIME STAFF WRITERS?

No one is looking at you to solve problems. No one is looking at you to point out the big hole in the season. No one is looking at you to pitch the perfect twist for the ultimate finale episode. They have so many levels above you that have been doing that and are being paid to figure those things out.

They have you there for a reason. What they want from you is your life experience and your willingness to contribute and a little bit of humility and positive energy. Someone to hang out with and has interesting contributions and can also let go when their contributions don’t work.

HOW DID YOU GET REPRESENTATION?

I got a manager through a friend. Stefano Agosto, who is now at AMC as an executive, was an assistant at Universal Cable Productions when I was an assistant. We were both dreaming of bigger and better things. We just bonded. At the time I was working for Noah Hawley. I had material and I had gotten into the Latino Writers Workshop and had met with a few managers. They read me, and either they were gun-shy or I just didn’t like them enough to sell myself. It just wasn’t working. He called me up and said, “Hey, a manager came to a meeting with my boss and asked me if I had been tracking any good writers. I said yeah, and I want to give him your script because I really like it.” I said yes, absolutely. That was totally cool with me.

I made a big writer faux pas. I didn’t have much material to back it up with. So I met with Steve Smith at Stagecoach Entertainment. He was like, you don’t have much material, but this was really good. He had some thoughts on where it could go and how to make it better. He gave me some notes. We talked about how I came up. Ultimately I had, and still have, the goal that I want to be a showrunner someday. I want to tell stories that aren’t being told and I want to hire people that don’t get hired. That’s the kind of person I want to be.

He liked the attitude, loved the personality. The one sample was cool. The other stuff he read and was like you can’t really use it because it was comedy. What I did was I took his notes and I turned a rewrite around, I think we met on a Tuesday and by Friday I had a rewrite. He was like, wow, you work really quickly. He read it over the weekend and on Monday he was like, “This is really good. You took my notes and added things I didn’t see, so we want to sign you.”

ADVICE ON TAKING STAFFING AND GENERAL MEETINGS.

Try to find something to talk about and bond over other than the reason why you’re there, but then never forget why you’re there. When I got staffed on AMERICAN CRIME, I met with John the week he won the Oscar for 12 YEARS A SLAVE. I was in the lobby and I kept saying, “Don’t talk about the Oscar. Don’t talk about the Oscar,” because the conversation will become tell me about what’s been the last year of your life and I will not get to talk about myself.

So I went in the room, I think I said something like congratulations on all your recent success. He said thank you. Then on his bookcase was a Raymond Chandler novel and I had just finished reading The Big Sleep. I said, “Oh, Raymond Chandler, I love Raymond Chandler. I just finished reading The Big Sleep.” He goes, “That’s my favorite book. I read it eight times.” Then we started talking about The Long Goodbye, which I had never read. So that was like fifteen minutes of just Raymond Chandler talk. Then he segued into tell me about yourself.

At that point I had read the script and so I was telling my life story, but I was touching on moments that I knew he could mine for this character, Tony. I went in there knowing that I’m going to pitch myself as the guy who can write Tony the character, but I’m not going to say that, I’m going to embody it. This character in the script, he gets arrested for getting into some juvenile delinquency and so I said, well I grew up in East LA and I’ve been in trouble with the law, but nothing serious, I was just kind of a delinquent. I wasn’t lying and I wasn’t putting on a show. I was being honest about a specific element of my life that applies to the story that he was trying to tell. I always have the attitude of what can I do for the showrunner, because it’s his or her vision. What can I do to bring it to life?

WHAT IS THE MOST COMMON QUESTION ASPIRING WRITERS ASK YOU? HOW DO YOU RESPOND TO THEM?

How do I get an agent/first writing job? The answer to that is complicated, because there is no one absolute method that works. That being said, there is one absolute method that will get you there eventually: hone your craft. Getting a job, and getting and agent or manager will happen if your work is undeniable. We can all always do better work. So anyone who believes they don’t have any further to grow and are ready “as is” are already selling themselves short. You may be at a level that is hirable, so that means it’s only a matter of time until that happens. If it doesn’t happen soon, then get better. Get so good that people will fight to represent and hire you. Then you are in the driver’s seat. The other side to working on your own material is to make lots of friends at all levels in the industry. The intern you supervise might someday be the next Shonda Rhimes or Vince Gilligan, why not get in on the ground floor? I’m not saying to live your life trying to use people, quite the opposite. Live your life trying to do good for others and eventually that good will you’ve shown in life will come around in some way.

WHAT OTHER ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR WRITERS IN THE EARLY STAGES OF THEIR CAREERS?

Don’t give up. If this job were easy, everyone would do it. The hardest part is staying committed to the craft. Many people start out willing to fail, to chase their dream and damn all else in pursuit of it. Accept that you will fail a fair amount of times, but above that, be willing to succeed. Be willing to do the hard work, to get past the tough times, to embrace success and what it will bring you. Chase success and enjoy the process of getting there. The journey towards your goals is what makes up the bulk of your life. It should be satisfying to you right now, at whatever stage you are at. Because once you get that first writing job, that’s only the beginning of a whole new set of struggles you will have to navigate. That’s when the work really starts.


Kelly Jo Brick is a TVWriter™ Contributing Editor. She’s a television and documentary writer and producer, as well as a winner of Scriptapalooza TV and a Sundance Fellow. Read more about her HERE.

Kelly Jo Brick: Takeaways from the Austin Film Festival and Screenwriting Conference

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Terry Rossio and Shane Black in Austin, TX.  Photo courtesy of Austin Film Festival (Photo by Jack Plunkett)

by Kelly Jo Brick

The Austin Film Festival and Screenwriting Conference, an event dedicated to focusing on writers’ contributions to television and film, celebrated its 22nd year by bringing together aspiring and established writers, producers, filmmakers, development executives, agents, managers and directors.

Attendees to the screenwriting conference had the opportunity to choose from a wide variety of panels on writing for television and film. TVWriter.com was there to bring you some of the top takeaways from the event.

ABOUT BREAKING IN –

  • “To me, a good script is a good script, is a good script.” It takes writing 12 scripts to finally hit your groove as a writer. Write pilots and features to find your voice, then write a spec or two of a current show just so you know you can write in another’s voice and, “Don’t submit a script unless it’s good. You only get one shot.” – Matthew Gross, Producer, BODY OF PROOF, DIRTY SEXY MONEY
  • “Don’t just write one pilot. Write ten of them. Don’t ever stop.” The fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh are going to be better. Keep writing. — Mark Goffman, LIMITLESS, SLEEPY HOLLOW
  • Write plays. Many showrunners expressed their interest in reading and considering plays as a writing sample for staffing.
  • Writers tend to isolate themselves. Surround yourself with other writers and supporters. If you’re part of a herd, you’re protected. You might get jostled around, a little banged up, but when you’re in the group, a cheetah isn’t going to be able to grab you like it would if you were on your own. – Shane Black, LETHAL WEAPON
  • “If you can possibly give it up, give it up. The only reason you should do this is because you have no choice.” – Wes Brown, GOLIATH
  • “Don’t give out your script until it’s absolutely ready.” You only get one chance. First impressions are important. – Lindsay Goffman, Head of Development 3AD.
  • Always have something else, another script, ideas you could pitch. As a writer, keep cranking out content. – Matthew McDuffie, ODD GIRL OUT, BURNING BODHI
  • Your first script to get in will often never get made, but it helps you develop your voice and get in. – Mark Swift, FREDDY VS. JASON, FRIDAY THE 13TH

TAKING MEETINGS

  • “It all starts with the material and the talent.” Never undercut the value that you represent, so when you go into a meeting, own the space. You are worthy and deserve to be there. – Shane Black
  • Be confident. Breathe and remember, “This is my time. This is my space. This is the chair they’re paying me to be in.” — Pamela Ribon, SAMANTHA WHO?, HOT PROPERTIES
  • When you go into a meeting own it. If they ask if you’ve thought of changing something, don’t immediately say yes. Own what you created, so your passion shows. – Erika Weinstein, Director of Scripted Programming at AMC
  • Have questions. – Amy Berg, COUNTERPART, DA VINCI’S DEMONS

WHEN YOU GET ON A STAFF

  • The process of finding your place in the room can be interesting, “Figure out how you serve the showrunner and make his/her life easier.” — Chris Provenzano, JUSTIFIED, MAD MEN
  • “Working in a writers’ room is about serving the showrunner.”  Every showrunner is different so take time to learn what he or she needs and wants. – Stu Zicherman, THE AMERICANS

CHOOSING WHAT TO WRITE

  • “Write what excites you.” – Lindsay Goffman
  • “If you chase anything in the marketplace, it’s gone by the time you get there. So make something as unique as possible.” — Chris Provenzano
  • When you’re starting out, “Write your best stuff and forget about the budget. Get it down. Today that’s not your problem. Today your problem is to tell the story,” Jeb Stuart, DIE HARD.
  • An idea has no value. Write, write, write. – Nancy Pimental, SHAMELESS, SOUTH PARK
  • “There’s a channel for pretty much whatever you want to create.” Write to your strength and passion. Let the cards fall from there and with so many outlets out there, it will find the right home. – Mark Goffman
  • The next script can rebrand you. Only you can write yourself into a corner. – Amy Berg
  • “Starting is the hardest part.” You just have to start, period. – Shane Black

STORYTELLING

  • Action should always further story or character.  “If you imbed the story in the action, they can’t cut it.” – Jeb Stuart
  • Stories are like making coffee, they occur in drips and drops. You have to let it percolate, after a while, it be will become thick and rich. – Shane Black

DEALING WITH YOUR NEGATIVE INNER VOICE

  • Reason with it, then go watch TV. The people who wrote those shows got through it, you can too. – Issa Rae, THE MISADVENTURES OF AWKWARD BLACK GIRL
  • Keep writing. Your mind gets distracted by the problems and interest of writing and loses that fear. – Shane Black
  • Enjoy the process. We all have fear and self-loathing. Celebrate all the small victories. – Mark Swift

GETTING NOTES

  • Listen first, because they’re noticing something that didn’t work. Even if the advice seems dumb, there is an issue and you have to figure out what they’re really noticing and find a solution. – Peter Craig, THE TOWN, THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY – PARTS I AND II.
  • Hear the note behind the note. They’re not giving you the answer, but something isn’t working and it’s up to you as the writer to figure it out. As you approach the note, be humble and smart and remind yourself, “I can do it. I’m good enough. I can come up with something else.” — Chris Provenzano

Kelly Jo Brick is a Contributing Editor at TVWriter™. She’s a television and documentary writer and producer, as well as a winner of Scriptapalooza TV and a Sundance Fellow. Read more about her HERE.

Welcome to the Turning Point for Intelligent Television

No, we don’t mean the technology. We mean the writing.

Yay, team!

bb11by Sarah Fonder

Despite the oft-repeated assertion that this is the Golden Age of Television, TV has typically not been too kind to smart, well-written shows. When a network puts an underdog series like Bunheads or Happy Endings on the cutting board, it’s hard not to go from panic to complete resignation. Too many of us have had to get used to the phrase “brilliant but cancelled,” and for a long time it’s looked like daring television just isn’t all that lucrative. Thankfully, recent reports prove this might finally be changing: believe it or not, critical darlings are actually making money.

The past few weeks have seen the once underrated Breaking Bad move from cult hit to definite success, and previously hesitant advertisers are taking notice in a big way. After a record-breaking season premiere, The New York Times reported that ad space in the final episodes of Breaking Bad is so highly coveted that a 30-second commercial is worth $300,000. These kinds of high-end ad fees are incredibly rare for cable, usually reserved for network television shows with way larger audiences (ad space for juggernauts like American Idol runs around $500,000). One could chalk this success up to the fast-paced narrative that made shows like Lost into huge hits, but the slow-burning Mad Men also broke viewership records for AMC in its season six finale.

And AMC itself has proved to be worth a lot for a channel that prides itself as a thinking person’s network. Though its shows don’t have the massive ratings of Dancing with the Stars or NCISAMC’s content has done so well that they’ve gradually been able to charge cable companies more money to host it. And those companies are paying, whether they like it or not: last year, Dish Network almost dropped AMC after a rise in prices, but complaining subscribers proved the channel was worth the investment. AMC’s dedication to smart TV has paid off: Mad Men andBreaking Bad sweep the Emmys year after year, and The Walking Dead was the tenth most popular show of the 2012-13 season.

The other big success story is Netflix, which saw more growth than ever after the decision to add good original programming….

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AMC and ATT Make a Deal in Nick of Time – Wotta Shocker!

AMC Networks, AT&T Reach New Carriage Deal
by George Szalai

AMC Networks, the company behind cable networks AMC, IFC, and WE tv, AT&T’s U-verse pay TV service, unveiled a new carriage agreement on Sunday.

“We have reached a long-term agreement with AT&T that appropriately recognizes the value of our networks and our award-winning and high-quality programming,” AMC Networks said. “We respect AT&T as a partner that has a genuine interest in working with us to ensure their customers continue to enjoy our programming, which includes the upcoming July 15 premiere of AMC’s Breaking Bad…”

Earlier this weekend, satellite TV giant Dish Network dropped the channels of AMC Networks, including “The Walking Dead” home and flagship network AMC….

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Looks like Dish Network subscribers are still plumb out of luck. Unless there’s a miraculous, last-minute agreement, plucked out of the air as though by God. Which, btw, is pretty much what always happens in these situations.

Just sayin’.