Kelly Jo Brick: The Write Path With SUPERNATURAL’S Davy Perez, Part 2

A series of interviews with hard-working writers – by another hard-working writer!

by Kelly Jo Brick

Aspiring writers often wonder how the pros got where they are. The truth is, everyone’s story is different, but there are some common elements: dedication, persistence, hard work and not giving up.

Persistence and positive attitude were major influences in the development of Davy Perez’s career in entertainment. Born and raised in East LA, Davy became involved with a sketch group and worked as a background actor before following his creative passions as a writer. Acceptance into multiple writing programs helped lead the way to him becoming a staff writer for the highly acclaimed TV show AMERICAN CRIME. He now writes for the CW series, SUPERNATURAL.

HOW DID YOU GET THE WRITING JOB ON AMERICAN CRIME?

One of the executives I met with who had a producing deal was Michael McDonald. I went in to his office for a general meeting and he was in pilot production of AMERICAN CRIME. We talked about the script and talked about my own upbringing and when I was a teenager and getting into trouble. They had a character on the show that was going to go through this arc. He was kind of like; you’re very close to the character in a lot of ways. He was also tickled by the fact that we knew each other, you used to get coffee and now you’re here and that’s fantastic. He said, “You should meet John Ridley, I think he’d really like your story.”

I met John and that’s how I got staffed on AMERICAN CRIME. For that to be the first show that I got to work on was a huge blessing, because we were trying to be socially conscious, and also the level of work that I was surrounded by, the people I was surrounded by, from the cast to the crew to writing. I was very humbled and am still humbled to be able to say this was the company I was part of. That job wasn’t just a job, it was the beginning of my career.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR FIRST TIME STAFF WRITERS?

No one is looking at you to solve problems. No one is looking at you to point out the big hole in the season. No one is looking at you to pitch the perfect twist for the ultimate finale episode. They have so many levels above you that have been doing that and are being paid to figure those things out.

They have you there for a reason. What they want from you is your life experience and your willingness to contribute and a little bit of humility and positive energy. Someone to hang out with and has interesting contributions and can also let go when their contributions don’t work.

HOW DID YOU GET REPRESENTATION?

I got a manager through a friend. Stefano Agosto, who is now at AMC as an executive, was an assistant at Universal Cable Productions when I was an assistant. We were both dreaming of bigger and better things. We just bonded. At the time I was working for Noah Hawley. I had material and I had gotten into the Latino Writers Workshop and had met with a few managers. They read me, and either they were gun-shy or I just didn’t like them enough to sell myself. It just wasn’t working. He called me up and said, “Hey, a manager came to a meeting with my boss and asked me if I had been tracking any good writers. I said yeah, and I want to give him your script because I really like it.” I said yes, absolutely. That was totally cool with me.

I made a big writer faux pas. I didn’t have much material to back it up with. So I met with Steve Smith at Stagecoach Entertainment. He was like, you don’t have much material, but this was really good. He had some thoughts on where it could go and how to make it better. He gave me some notes. We talked about how I came up. Ultimately I had, and still have, the goal that I want to be a showrunner someday. I want to tell stories that aren’t being told and I want to hire people that don’t get hired. That’s the kind of person I want to be.

He liked the attitude, loved the personality. The one sample was cool. The other stuff he read and was like you can’t really use it because it was comedy. What I did was I took his notes and I turned a rewrite around, I think we met on a Tuesday and by Friday I had a rewrite. He was like, wow, you work really quickly. He read it over the weekend and on Monday he was like, “This is really good. You took my notes and added things I didn’t see, so we want to sign you.”

ADVICE ON TAKING STAFFING AND GENERAL MEETINGS.

Try to find something to talk about and bond over other than the reason why you’re there, but then never forget why you’re there. When I got staffed on AMERICAN CRIME, I met with John the week he won the Oscar for 12 YEARS A SLAVE. I was in the lobby and I kept saying, “Don’t talk about the Oscar. Don’t talk about the Oscar,” because the conversation will become tell me about what’s been the last year of your life and I will not get to talk about myself.

So I went in the room, I think I said something like congratulations on all your recent success. He said thank you. Then on his bookcase was a Raymond Chandler novel and I had just finished reading The Big Sleep. I said, “Oh, Raymond Chandler, I love Raymond Chandler. I just finished reading The Big Sleep.” He goes, “That’s my favorite book. I read it eight times.” Then we started talking about The Long Goodbye, which I had never read. So that was like fifteen minutes of just Raymond Chandler talk. Then he segued into tell me about yourself.

At that point I had read the script and so I was telling my life story, but I was touching on moments that I knew he could mine for this character, Tony. I went in there knowing that I’m going to pitch myself as the guy who can write Tony the character, but I’m not going to say that, I’m going to embody it. This character in the script, he gets arrested for getting into some juvenile delinquency and so I said, well I grew up in East LA and I’ve been in trouble with the law, but nothing serious, I was just kind of a delinquent. I wasn’t lying and I wasn’t putting on a show. I was being honest about a specific element of my life that applies to the story that he was trying to tell. I always have the attitude of what can I do for the showrunner, because it’s his or her vision. What can I do to bring it to life?

WHAT IS THE MOST COMMON QUESTION ASPIRING WRITERS ASK YOU? HOW DO YOU RESPOND TO THEM?

How do I get an agent/first writing job? The answer to that is complicated, because there is no one absolute method that works. That being said, there is one absolute method that will get you there eventually: hone your craft. Getting a job, and getting and agent or manager will happen if your work is undeniable. We can all always do better work. So anyone who believes they don’t have any further to grow and are ready “as is” are already selling themselves short. You may be at a level that is hirable, so that means it’s only a matter of time until that happens. If it doesn’t happen soon, then get better. Get so good that people will fight to represent and hire you. Then you are in the driver’s seat. The other side to working on your own material is to make lots of friends at all levels in the industry. The intern you supervise might someday be the next Shonda Rhimes or Vince Gilligan, why not get in on the ground floor? I’m not saying to live your life trying to use people, quite the opposite. Live your life trying to do good for others and eventually that good will you’ve shown in life will come around in some way.

WHAT OTHER ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR WRITERS IN THE EARLY STAGES OF THEIR CAREERS?

Don’t give up. If this job were easy, everyone would do it. The hardest part is staying committed to the craft. Many people start out willing to fail, to chase their dream and damn all else in pursuit of it. Accept that you will fail a fair amount of times, but above that, be willing to succeed. Be willing to do the hard work, to get past the tough times, to embrace success and what it will bring you. Chase success and enjoy the process of getting there. The journey towards your goals is what makes up the bulk of your life. It should be satisfying to you right now, at whatever stage you are at. Because once you get that first writing job, that’s only the beginning of a whole new set of struggles you will have to navigate. That’s when the work really starts.


Kelly Jo Brick is a TVWriter™ Contributing Editor. She’s a television and documentary writer and producer, as well as a winner of Scriptapalooza TV and a Sundance Fellow. Read more about her HERE.

Love & Money Dept – TV Writing Deals for 7/25/13

Latest News About Writers Who Are Doing Better Than We Are

  • David Schulner (THE EVENT) is developing the drama series CLONE for Universal Television, from the comic of the same name by Robert Kirkman. (No network is involved yet, but if Kirkman’s THE WALKING DEAD continues its ratings dominance that won’t be a problem.)
  • KJ Steinberg (MISTRESSES) is writing the legal drama LAWLESS for ABC. (No problem withthis one getting on the air. It’s being done with Shonda Rhimes, and we all know how ABC feels about her. Hint: It’s a 4 letter word starting with “L” and it has a “V” in it too.)
  • Terry Matalas & Travis Fickett (TERRA NOVA) are writing the TV movie/backdoor pilot for 12 MONKEYS for Syfy. (Yeppers, we’re talking about that 12 MONKEYS, the Bruce Willis-starring feature film by Terry Gilliam. And those Syfy motherfuckers better not screw this up, y’hear?)
  • Speaking of the Evil Minions of Syfy, that network is looking for a writer for a miniseries to be called WARRIORS OF OZ, an action-adventure version of, oh, you guessed it, THE WIZARD OF OZ. (Nopoint in worrying about Syfy turning this into a steaming pile. Just from the concept we know that without one word written they already have.)
  • On a more positive note, Shane Dawson, a comedian with almost 9 million subscribers to his YouTube channels, just launched a podcast called SHANE AND FRIENDS which became #1 on iTunes within 24 hours. (In other words, the do-it-yourself showbiz model works, laddies and lassies. Write your own material, perform it, present it to the world, and you’ll never have to worry about Syfy’s execrable taste again!)

Love & Money Dept – TV Writing Deals for 11/2/12

 

“Love is never making your partner get a day job.” (Anon.)
  • Dan Harmon (COMMUNITY) has a pick-up from Adult Swim for his animated series RICK AND MARTY, about an inventor and his grandson/sidekick. (Proving you can’t go wrong with Mr. Peabody & the Wayback Machine)
  • David DiGilo (Disney Writer Program – awesome) is adapting Debra Driza’s soon-to-be-published novel Mila 2.0 into a sci-fi thriller series for ABC. (Proving that new writers should all make friends as possible with extra-hot writer-producers like Shonda Rhimes, whose company is producing this baby. )
  • Jason Jones (THE DAILY SHOW) is writing the pilot for a Fox sitcom about a single guy acting as guardian for his sister’s kids. (Proving that the concept doesn’t have to be all that high when a hot actor like Steve Carell is producing, as he is here.)
  • Robert Padnick (THE OFFICE) has written a sitcom pilot about four people trying to deal with their relationship problems and sold it to NBC. (Proving that if you partner up with somebody like Greg Daniels, producer of the soon to be late, lamented THE OFFICE, as Robert has, not only do you not need a high concept, no concept will work just fine too.)
  • Lew Morton (FUTURAMA, ROB) has partnered with Jake Kasdan (NEW GIRL, FREAKS & GEEKS, THE ZERO EFFECT) on WENTWORTH HALL, an animated comedy for Fox. (Proving that go-to guys help cinch deals even for writers who don’t really need go-to guys.)

We trust that you’ve all learned today’s important lesson.