Why Do Audiences Hate Scripted TV?

This really is something to worry about:

ncis with exwife

Ever wonder how to plagiarize without being called on it? The technique goes something like this:

The top 10 regularly scheduled television broadcasts of 2012 were dominated by sports and reality shows, with very little scripted programming represented, reports MediaPost’s MediaDailyNews.

Three of the top 10 regularly scheduled shows were sports, with NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” ranking No. 1 in total viewers, the story says. The NFL series has averaged 21.2 million viewers this season.

Fox’s “American Idol” holds the second and third spots with its two weekly airings (18 million for the Wednesday performance show and 16.5 million for the results show), while NBC’s pregame show for its “Sunday Night Football” is in fourth place with 15.7 million.

ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” holds fifth and sixth place with its two weekly airings, drawing an average of 15.5 million for the performance show and 13.9 million for the results show.

CBS’s “NCIS” is one of two scripted shows to make the list, placing seventh with an average of 13.6 million viewers. NBC’s “The Voice” holds eighth place, with 13.3 million.

In ninth place is the only cable series on the list: ESPN’s “Monday Night Football,” with 13.2 million viewers.

CBS also has the only other scripted series in the top 10, the new drama “Vegas,” in 10th place with an average of 11.7 million viewers, the story says.

Cool, huh? But don’t thank us. This example is courtesy of one of the most helpful TV sites on the web: TVBizwire. Without it, we’d have to – gulp – think for ourselves. And you know the chaos that would bring. (Of course, we did find the above pic on our own. Thanks, CBS!)

What Have We Learned from the 1st Week of the 2012 Season?

Some interesting bits, actually:

After One Week, Which TV Shows Look Good and Which Seem Doomed? – by Josef Adalian

Congratulations, fellow TV viewers: We’ve survived another premiere week! The networks threw all manner of new shows our way and forced us to fill our DVRs to bursting with returning favorites. It seems only fair that we repay their kindness by rushing to judgement about how their new lineups fared out of the gate, from the obvious winners to the Romney-esque losers. Yes, yes: One week does not a season make, particularly in an era when shows debut year-round and many viewers watch shows on their own damn schedules. But that caveat aside, we still think there are some early lessons to be drawn from the early days of the new season.

It’s more important than ever to pay attention to time-shifted viewing...

NBC has emerged from the Dark Ages

Fox is off to a rocky start...

We can already tell which shows are sticking around and which are doomed

TV’s grizzled veterans continue to defy gravity

Read the details

How “High Concept” Does Your Concept Have to Be?

No point in guessing. Just compare it to the premises for the shows below. Remember, regardless of what their ultimate fates may be, all these shows had premises that got them to the starting line…and scripts that took them beyond:

The Premise-O-Meter: Ranking the New TV Dramas – by Margaret Lyons (Vulture.Com)

ABC’s submarine drama Last Resort premieres tonight, and it’s a doozy: action, adventure, shouting, you name it. It’s great! But man, the show is heavy on concept: There’s a submarine, see, and it’s given an order to nuke Pakistan, but the captain doubts the integrity of the order, so he refuses to go through with it, and then they take over an island, and renegades, and the president, and a secret submarine prototype, and on and on and on. It’s a lot of premise. Not every fall show has this problem, though — there’s the other end of the spectrum, too, the premise-less end, the end where the show is about nothing and has nothing to say. Here are all your new fall dramas, ranked in order of complexity.

ACK! THAT’S A LOT OF PREMISE

Last Resort: See above.

Revolution: A close second. There’s a global blackout, and 15 years later, everything is run by scary militias, and there are freedom fighters and people who want to turn the lights back on, and a lady with a secret internet in her attic, and a girl whose parents are dead, and there’s sword-fighting and a few jokes. So far, the show is heavy on concept and light on character.

666 Park Avenue: An attractive young couple moves into the Manhattan apartment of their dreams, only to discover that the building and its residents are possessed by dark, supernatural forces. It’s sort of like Revenge, but with the devil instead of vengeance.

Nashville: A country music legend grapples with her fading stardom and there’s a young up-and-comer who’s trying to push her out of the spotlight. Enough of a hook to be a soap, but not so much nonsense that it feels like a bad episode of Melrose Place.

Elementary: Sherlock Holmes is now a British ex-pat living in present-day New York; Watson is now a woman and is Holmes’s sober-living companion. It’s fancy, but it’s still just a procedural.

Vegas: Just a ’70s cop show.

Chicago Fire: Dick Wolf made a show about firefighters. It’s sort of like Third Watch, except much dumber.

Emily Owens, MD: She’s a doctor. Mean girls exist.

The Mob Doctor: She’s a doctor. The mob exists.

Made In Jersey: She’s a lawyer. New Jersey exists.

ACK! THAT IS NOT ENOUGH OF A PREMISE

Yes, you’re right. The networks do not practice what they preach. Ask  your teachers in the film-TV department what that means. Let us know if they can even pretend to have an answer.

Are These The Best Shows of the Coming Season?

Writer Alison Willmore of IndieWire.Com thinks so, but we aren’t so sure:

Fall’s Five Most Promising-Looking New Network TV Shows – by Alison Willmore

Summer has come to an unofficial end, and with fall arrives the start of the TV season and a host of shiny new series. While the cable channels are on a year-round calendar these days, staggering their shows’ seasons throughout the year, the broadcast networks still use September and October to launch the majority of their returning and first-time programs. While the offerings on the big four networks don’t tend to display the creative freedom that cable series do, there’s always the chance that a new “30 Rock,” “Community” or “The Good Wife” sneaks in under the radar. Here are our picks for the five most promising-looking new shows on the big networks this fall, from a 1960s-set Western to a supernatural drama.

“666 Park Avenue”
Premiere: Sunday, September 30, at 10pm on ABC

The idea of something demonic lurking in the upscale apartment blocks of the Upper East Side is an appealing one — how else do people afford those rents?…

“Elementary”
Premiere: Tuesday, September 25, at 10pm on CBS

Obviously, if we had to choose only one modern-day interpretation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous character, it would be the delightfully snippy incarnation of the legendary detective engineered by BBC and Benedict Cumberbatch

“The Mindy Project”
Premiere: Tuesday, September 25, at 9:30pm on Fox

“The Office” alum Mindy Kaling is a welcome addition to the continuing evolution and growing prominence of funny women on the big and small screens…

“Nashville”
Premiere: Wednesday, October 10, at 10pm on ABC

Connie Britton stole our hearts as mother (or for some, MILF) extraordinaire Tami Taylor on “Friday Night Lights,” and her well-deserved lead role in the ABC drama “Nashville,” written and created by Oscar-winning “Thelma & Louise” screenwriter Callie Khouri, suggests that her steel magnolia stylings are going to be put to appropriate use…

“Vegas”
Premiere: Tuesday, September 25, at 10pm on CBS

So last year’s “Mad Men” knockoffs “The Playboy Club” and “Pan Am” didn’t make it to a second season (or, in the case of the former, very far into a first season). But while “Vegas” may also be set in the ’60s, it’s not another saga of retro drinking habits and sexism in one of our nation’s urban centers. “Vegas” is a Western, one set in the title town several decades before the arrival of the flagship “CSI” series…

Read it all

Sorry Alison, but only 1 of your 5 choices has a chance of working for me. THE MINDY PROJECT and NASHVILLE are for chicks, which leaves me out. The BBC’s SHERLOCK satisfies my need for, um, Sherlock so why settle for ELEMENTARY? And VEGAS? C’mon, we’re talking about the most overrated city in the U.S. With one of the country’s dullest actors in the lead.

But 666 PARK AVENUE, that we’ll check out. A Satanic building New York City’s Upper East Side? Which one isn’t? Sold.

CBS Fall 2012 Premiere Dates

Honking press release:

CBS ANNOUNCES 2012-2013 PREMIERE DATES

Wednesday, Sept. 19

  • 8:00-9:30 PM SURVIVOR: PHILIPPINES (25th edition premiere)

Monday, Sept. 24

  • 8:00-8:30 PM How I Met Your Mother (8th season premiere)
  • 8:30-9:00 PM Partners (Series Debut)
  • 9:00-9:30 PM 2 Broke Girls (2nd season premiere)
  • 9:30-10:00 PM MIKE & Molly (3rd season premiere)
  • 10:00-11:00 PM Hawaii Five-0 (3rd season premiere)

Tuesday, Sept. 25

  • 8:00-9:00 PM NCIS (10th season premiere)
  • 9:00-10:00 PM NCIS: LOS ANGELES (4th season premiere)
  • 10:00-11:00 PM Vegas (Series Debut)

Wednesday, Sept. 26

  • 9:00-10:00 PM Criminal Minds (8th season premiere)
  • 10:00-11:00 PM CSI: CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (13th season premiere)

Thursday, Sept. 27

  • 8:00-8:30 PM The Big Bang Theory (6th season premiere)
  • 8:30-9:00 PM Two and a Half Men (10th season premiere)
  • 9:00-10:00 PM Person Of Interest (2nd season premiere)
  • 10:00-11:00 PM Elementary (Series Debut)

Friday, Sept. 28

  • 8:00-9:00 PM CSI: NY (9thseason premiere)
  • 9:00-10:00 PM Made In Jersey (Series Debut)
  • 10:00-11:00 PM Blue Bloods (3rdseason premiere

Saturday, Sept. 29

  • 10:00-11:00 PM 48 Hours Mystery (26th season premiere)

Sunday, Sept. 30

  • 7:00-8:00 PM 60 Minutes (45th season premiere)
  • 8:00-9:00 PM THE Amazing Race (21st edition premiere)
  • 9:00-10:00 PM THE Good Wife (4th season premiere)
  • 10:00-11:00 PM THE Mentalist (5thseason premiere)