The Doctor Has a Little Talk – With Superman & Batman

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In honor of DOCTOR WHO’s 50th Anniversary, which is – yowsa! – today, TVWriter™ is thrilled to bring you this very special episode of How It Should Have Ended’s Super Cafe.

Cuz as far as we’re concerned, this is genuinely funny as hell:

Yo, Superman and Batman Fans: Here’s Your Last Shot at a Bruce Timm Warner Bros. Cartoon

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We Found This Beautiful Image HERE

Remember all those Saturday morning animated versions of D.C. Comics heroes you loved in the ’80s and ’90s? A lot of very talented people took part in their creation (we’re talking about you, LB buddy Stan Berkowitz – how many Emmy awards did you end up with for those?). But the dude who put together the team and made it all work was Bruce Timm, who recently left his long-running Executive Producer gig at Warners.

So we’re smiling from ear to ear as a result of learning, via a short mention in the Hollywood Reporter, that Maestro Timm is returning to take part in an animated short honoring Superman’s 75th anniversary. It’s called SUPERMAN UNCHAINED. The creators of this 2-minute enterprise are writer Scott Snyder and D.C. co-publisher and artist Jim Lee.

According to some linked details, the production will be:

…one continuous shot showing us “the Man of Steel and his many iterations over the past 75 years [featuring ] Max Fleischer’s cartoons, on-screen portrayals by George Reeves and Christopher Reeve, iconic versions drawn by artists Wayne Boring, Curt Swan and Neal Adams, on up through Henry Cavill’s interpretation in Man of Steel.

Also involved are MAN OF STEEL storyboard artist Jay Oliva, Geoff Johns and Mike Carlin and WB Animation’s Peter Girardi.

To steal a word more commonly associated with DOCTOR WHO fandom: Squee!

bruce_timm_by_dkdeliciousAnd now, heeere’s Bruce!

DEXTER & BURN NOTICE: Fun in the Sun? Or Something Much Darker?

And now, a little overthink for those of you who prefer it when your cortexes go ka-blam!

Miami Justice: Two Sides of the Same Coin – by Ben Adams

Why do we punish? And why is it so much fun to see punishment doled out? From crime procedurals like Law and Order to superheroes dominating the box office inThe Dark Knight Rises and The Avengers, we seem to have a collective fascination with the punishment of wrong-doers. But where does the urge to punish come from? Why are we so insistent that the wicked suffer? Because that’s the key question – punishment, but it’s very nature, is generally backwards looking. Punishing the murderer doesn’t bring back the dead. What good does it do anyone to inflict further suffering, even if it seems like someone “deserves” it? My colleague Matthew Belinkie has explored the legal side of punishment at length, so I’m going to turn my attention towards the extra-legal side of punishment – the vigilante.

In the real world, punishment is the exclusive domain of the state – finding and punishing wrong-doers is arguably what makes a government a government. Preventing individuals from enforcing the law themselves is a vitally important part of maintaining order. In pop culture, though, the vigilante is often seen as a viable – if not preferable – alternative to governmental punishment. There’s nothing we like more than to see one man, alone against the criminal underworld.

Why do we punish? And why is it so much fun to see punishment doled out? From crime procedurals like Law and Order to superheroes dominating the box office inThe Dark Knight Rises and The Avengers, we seem to have a collective fascination with the punishment of wrong-doers. But where does the urge to punish come from? Why are we so insistent that the wicked suffer? Because that’s the key question – punishment, but it’s very nature, is generally backwards looking. Punishing the murderer doesn’t bring back the dead. What good does it do anyone to inflict further suffering, even if it seems like someone “deserves” it? My colleague Matthew Belinkie has explored the legal side of punishment at length, so I’m going to turn my attention towards the extra-legal side of punishment – the vigilante.

In the real world, punishment is the exclusive domain of the state – finding and punishing wrong-doers is arguably what makes a government a government. Preventing individuals from enforcing the law themselves is a vitally important part of maintaining order. In pop culture, though, the vigilante is often seen as a viable – if not preferable – alternative to governmental punishment. There’s nothing we like more than to see one man, alone against the criminal underworld.

In two different long- running TV shows, Burn Notice and Dexter, audiences tune in week after week to see an attractive white male in his 30s run around Miami and take the law into his own hands. Both characters have deep seated psychological issues stemming from their fathers, have loose ties to the government, and will not stop narrating. This isn’t all accidental – both characters relationship with their fathers are indicative of the deeper ties between our fathers and punishment (See also: Batman, Superman, Iron Man, James Bond, etc.) The tropical setting provides a stark contrast to the darkness of the crimes being fought, and the constant narration keeps the audience rooting for the protagonist, even when his actions would normally have us dialing 911 and calling for them to get sent to the electric chair.

Dexter always kills his victims, while Michael Weston sometimes just scares them away or gets them arrested, but the two men are still fundamentally the same – they have both decided that the government is falling down on the job, and that justice demands they take the law into their own hands. What truly separates the two men is why they do what they do. To understand these two vigilantes and their appeal to the TV audience, we need to explore the reasons that anyone would want to punish someone in the first place.

Read it all

All the Cool Guys R Drummers

Gene Krupa, Bill Cosby,  Billy Bob Thornton, Buddy Rich, Johnny Carson, Jimmy Kimmel, Keith Moon, David Letterman, Mel Torme, John Bonham, Fred Astaire, David Chase, Larry Brody…

Oh, and these two guys:

Yep, Batman and Mr. Spock – um, we mean Adam West and Leonard Nimoy. Who knew?

Wonder if Christian Bale and Zach Quinto also drum…?

An Unauthorized, Way Cool Stop-Motion Batman Video

“Batman: Dark Knightfall” is a Batman fan made stop-motion animation directed by Derek Kwok and Henri Wong of Parabucks Co. using Batman action figures made and sold by Hot Toys.

We’ve loved stop-motion ever since do we really have to say? okay, okay the GUMBY reruns of our childhood. This, though, is better than GUMBY – much.

And the toys are kinda better than the crap cheapo Gumby toys too. (Are Gumby toys even made anymore? Can we be sued?)