Looking for TV Scripts from U.S. Sitcoms?

A few days ago we showed where to get your drama script fix. Now it’s time for some comedies:

30Rock script

Click the Pic & Ye shall Find! (Alert – this collection isn’t as complete as the Drama collection…sorry)

Invisible Mikey: Yet Another Reason

invisiblemikey.wordpress

…to remain invisible.

I ran into this by accident when looking for something else.  I had completely forgotten it.  Well, it was 25 years ago.  This was my first “union” job in Hollywood, after I had earned the SAG card.  I got paid a few hundred dollars to shout “YAY!” in the background of the commercial.  I’m turned away from camera.  The bar is a set.  The lead actor, Paul Hogan (Crocodile Dundee), was a nice-looking but only average-sized man.  Therefore, to make him look big and macho, the bar set and everything in it is just a little bit smaller than the real thing.  I remembered the casting call.  They chose a variety of “looks”, with only one requirement.  You couldn’t be any taller than 5’7”.  The guy on the stool next to Paul talking to him is Leslie Jordan.  He’s just under 5 feet tall.  It’s a good thing I never filmed anything embarrassing, aside from the fact that much of it was bad TV.  This stuff sticks around forever!

Originally published on Invisible Mikey’s Blog

EDITED TO ADD: Thanks, Mikey!

Peer Production: THE REWARD

the reward

We found this 9 minute long animation by The Animation Workshop on Vimeo, and it’s good enough to remind us of “Old Disney,” which, if you’re a true fan, you know damn well is very, very good indeed.

Great music too.

To us, 9 minutes often seems to take forever, but this one flew by. So we definitely think you should watch! Enjoy! Um…learn?!

Don’t miss The Animation Workshop’s website.

And its Facebook page.

LB: Erik Mountain Blows Me Away

PersonOfInterestDeadReckoning-2

Just watched my DVR’d copy of last week’s PERSON OF INTEREST: DEAD RECKONING and enjoyed the hell out of it, as I enjoy all episodes of this show.

I mean, how could I not? It’s Batman if he were in the current/real world. No costume. No cave. Just attitude and badassery and computer hacking the way we all suspect it should be.

In other words, this time they got Bats Completely Right.

In this particular episode, however, I discovered something even more special than usual about its crunchy goodness.

It was written by PERSON OF INTEREST Story Editor Erik Mountain.

The same Erik Mountain who, just a few years ago, won the Grand Prize in the TVWriter™ 2006 Spec Scriptacular Contest for his spec BREAKING BAD, and whose name I’ve seen on – gotta count now, where the hell are my fingers? – 1, 2, 3, at least 4 different episodes.

Thanks for bringing so many people, including myself, so much pleasure, Erik dood. This is just the beginning for a Very Talented Guy.

Oh – almost forgot. Erik’s BREAKILNG BAD not only won the Spec Scriptacular, it also got him into the Warner Brothers Writers Workshop. Why not read a little interview with him about that?

Hey, it's Erik!
Hey, it’s Erik!

Read the PERSON OF INTEREST: DEAD RECKONING transcript.

Read a spoiler-laden synopsis.

Find out more about the Spec Scriptacular

A Young Creator-Showrunner Spills Some Secrets

But, dammit, he doesn’t tell us what we really want to know: How’d you get so hot? Especially when your first series was canceled after 3 episodes?

chad_hodge_headshot

Chad Hodge Talks ‘Playboy Club’ Lessons and His Wild Development Season
by Lesley Goldberg

Chad Hodge has come a long way from The Playboy Club.

The writer-producer behind NBC’s short-lived drama — which was canceled after three low-rated episodes in 2011 — has had an active development season, setting up three very different projects at the broadcast networks this season.

The first, Wayward Pines, is a potential limited-run series set up at Fox, with M. Night Shyamalan on board to executive produce the Twin Peaks-like event project about a secret service agent who arrives in the bucolic town of Wayward Pines, Id., on a mission to find two missing federal agents.

Second, Hodge is exploring  Alice in Wonderland,setting up a modern-day procedural with McG at the CW about a young female detective in Los Angeles who discovers another world that exists under the surface of this ultra-modern city.

And finally, Hodge is working with country singerMiranda Lambert for a semi-autobiographical comedy at NBC based on her experience growing up as the daughter of two PIs juggling a family.

The Hollywood Reporter caught up with Hodge to discuss the lessons he learned after The Playboy Clubimpacted his approach to development season.

The Hollywood Reporter: What did you learn from The Playboy Club?

Chad Hodge: I learned a lot of production lessons on Playboy Club. It didn’t work for a variety of reasons but it did work for a variety of other reasons. I think audiences really rejected that concept outright because no one really showed up for the pilot. The Playboy brand was maybe something that wasn’t exactly right for a network show. That has nothing to do with the show itself that we created. It was maybe just something that people didn’t want to watch.

THR: Looking back would you do it again minus the Playboy brand?
Hodge: Absolutely. It wasn’t even minus the Playboy brand. I had such a great time working with Hugh Hefner. When I first heard the idea pitched to me, my first reaction was a little bit like, “Ew, really? Playboy?” As soon as I started doing the research of what this story was and who these women were and what this show could be about I got really excited about it and realized that there was you know a whole truth to this world that was so interesting and revolutionary but I didn’t know that until I did the research. I feel like audiences rejected it in the same way that I did initially. Had they been able to continue watching the show in three or four episodes in they would probably had seen what I saw. Unfortunately, they didn’t get the chance to get that far.

THR: How did you handle getting the quick hook? Did it take some time to get back on track? 

Hodge: It was sad; it was definitely a bummer. I had to close all the episodes and so I still had work to do on them for a couple of months. You try to throw yourself into other work. I didn’t let myself be mad about it for very long because in the end, I got to make a show. I have a really great job that I love and so I tried to move on pretty quickly.

Read it all

WTF? People are pitching to this guy? Why? Why? Why? If you know, please tell us…and make it juicy.