Sometimes It Really Does Take a Village…of Parents

There’s a certain thing that happens when you become a parent. A softening, an increase in empathy. Ever wonder how that affects your creativity? Here’s an interesting discussion of the matter featuring one of our favorite as yet all-too-undiscovered writers, Ms. Cara Winter:

from Moms-in-Film

Cara Winter is the writer and co-director of Division, a short film currently crowdfunding on IndieGogo about a young, interracial couple who find themselves in a long-distance relationship… even though they live in the same city.

Moms-in-Film chatted with Cara about

Cara Winter & son Avery

the film, how she made the leap behind the camera and how childcare affects productions of every shape and size.

What’s your role on Division and how did it come about?

Division is a short film I co-wrote (and I’m also co-directing it, with my collaborator George Ellzey Jr.), and it is my first foray into producing my own work. Division is a short film about a young, interracial couple who find themselves in a long-distance relationship… even though they live in the same city. We think anyone who’ve ever had to sit in traffic for over an hour to see someone who lives less than 5 miles away will relate!

Why do you feel it’s important people see this story now?

In the film, the two main characters (who fall in love) happen to be from different ethnic backgrounds, but that isn’t the main thrust of the film?—?not at all. In fact, I don’t think we ever mention it! This was very much on purpose; to us, diversity is normalcy. All too often, in the great romantic comedies (from When Harry Met Sally to Garden State, to more recently La La Land) the main characters are usually white. (And if one of the them is non-white, it’s a major plot point.) With Division, we felt it was important for people to see two PEOPLE fall in love, who just happen to be from different ethnic backgrounds. But it’s NOT a plot point; they’re just people, falling in love, then trying to make a go of it.

Have you always been a writer/director?

No, I was an actress first; I got my undergraduate degree in Theater from NYU, and then I went on to have a stage career. I wasn’t a parent back then, and I travelled a ton? – ?national tours, summer stock, the works. Then, I got married and had a baby, and right away I was like, “I gotta do something else; I don’t want to travel all the time, I want to read to my son every night!”

Were you writing as well as acting at that time?

Writing was always something I’d done on the side, for fun, but once I became a parent, I started to put it more front-and-center. I wrote a play that was produced in New York, and my friend Howard Emanuel came to see it; he was an actor-turned-writer, as well….

Read it all at Medium.Com