How to Write a Web Series and Get Your TV Writing Career Going

Ya gotta start somewhere, right? Here’s a post from Script Reader Pro pointing you in a direction that differs from most starting gigs – because in and of itself, writing a web series can be more creatively and financially rewarding than many of us imagine:

Yes, it’s true. This is a very bad visual pun. Our apologies.

How to Write a Web Series and Get Your TV Writing Career Off the Ground
by Rebecca Norris

Are you an aspiring writer still wondering how to write for TV years after starting down the road? We’re going to show you how writing a web series could be your best move ever if your main aim is to become a TV writer.

This isn’t a post on how to write a web series but here are three reasons why creating your own web series is the best thing you can do to learn how to become a writer for TV. read article

Want to Score a Fellowship to TheOffice?

by TVWriter™ Press Service

Attention, TVWriter™ visitors. Here’s a peek into the kind of email we love to receive…because of the way it can benefit YOU:

Hi there, read article

The Perils, Pitfalls, and Cool Stuff That Come with Living in L.A.

Life in L.A. may not be a cabaret, but it IS a studio tour

LB’S NOTE: Speaking of where I live now that I’m, erm, sort of retired, here’s another perspective on the city where I abided for about 30 years (with, I admit, a few breaks in places like Santa Fe, NM and – God help me – Orlando, FLA.

by Larry Brody

Throughout my career, one of the most asked questions, usually uttered in a voice so filled with resentment and contempt that makes me want to pull out the AK I don’t (and never will) have and start blasting always has been:

“If I want to write for film or television, do I have to live in L.A.?” read article

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Star on What It Was Like Not Finding Success Until Her Fifties

Actress Ann Dowd tells the 2018 Glamour Women of the Year Summit how it felt to find success later in life, which when you get down to it is a thing we all need to consider, even – gasp! – writers:

by Ann Dowd

I want to tell you a brief story, if I may. When I was a young actress, 30 or so, I was on the way to my waitress job in my black pants and my white shirt and my black tie—glamour is not the word that would come to mind at all. Feminine? No. Nothing. I looked across the street, and there were several limousines parked outside the theater. And I looked at the marquee and it said, “About Last Nightstarring Elizabeth Perkins,” who was my classmate. I was going to wait on tables, and she was going to a premiere of her film that would launch her into stardom.

I got through the shift, and I went home on my porch, and I wept and screamed into the night, “When?! When is my turn?” And it was one of those dark nights of the soul—we’re all familiar, I’m sure. And a voice—I’m not kidding—quiet, probably from the inside, said, “It will all be fine. It will all be all right. You will be in your fifties. You will be 56.” And I said, “Oh no! No, no!”—missing the whole point of the voice—I said, “I’m not waiting until my fifties. I have no intention, so you can take that message and…” read article

The WGAW TV Writer Access Project Wants You

Speaking of opportunity (as we were below) here’s one of the biggest around: