Celluloid Ceiling Report: No Progress in 16 Years for Women in Hollywood

Gender discrimination. Disgusting:

by Melissa Silverstein

missingEvery January for the past 16 years, people who care about women’s progress behind the scenes in the film industry have restlessly anticipated Dr. Martha Lauzen’s Celluloid Ceiling analysis of the top 250 domestic films during the previous year.

The figures for women, according to Dr. Lauzen, have not improved in the 16 years since she’s published the story. In fact, things have gotten slightly worse. Here’s she has to say: read article

Hey, ARCHER Fans – How’re Ya Liking the Reboot?

The best action-comedy series on TV just got better. How could anybody not love ARCHER now that it’s – MIAMI VICE?

Whoa!

new-archer-miamiby Andy Greenwald

For a long time The Simpsons was the fastest show on television. A combination of highly caffeinated, Harvard-educated show-offs in the writers’ room and the complete creative freedom afforded by animation transformed what was originally intended to be a straight (if yellow) family sitcom into an ADD-explosion of satire, asides, cutaways, and jokes so in you’d need Professor Frink’s Hoax-a-Scope to locate them. read article

Peer Production: HELLA is Better than Its Title

HELL-A still Capture.tvwriter.com

…Which ain’t bad at all, really.

Know how we keep telling you to move to L.A. if you want to write for TV? Well, here’s a show about people who’ve done just that. Yeppers, gang, the lid is off, the truth is out: It’s hell. read article

Peggy Bechko: Writers Drawing The Line For Their Characters

drawtheline

by Peggy Bechko

We, as people, have all kinds of values and codes we live by whether we’re fully aware of how we define them or not. There are things that just stick in our craws or rub us the wrong way. There are lines that can’t or won’t be crossed and places we don’t want to go. Beliefs we hold dear and of course reactions to those held by others.

So, how can we use all this in writing.

Simple. read article

Why Shakespeare’s Contemporaries Hated Him

He made up his own words! Broke all the #@!ing rules! Of course other writers at the time thought he was crap. Mucho food for thought here, especially if you consider yourself a language purist:

n-SHAKESPEARE-WORDS-large57013 Words Invented by Shakespeare
from Huffington Post
(which should credit the writer but we can’t find it)

Like Precalculus and Newton’s laws, Shakespeare’s plays are among the most groaned-about high school topics, begetting the complaint: “When will I ever need to know about this in real life?” Turns out, pretty often. Shakespeare can be credited for the invention of thousands of words that are now an everyday part of the English language (including, but not limited to, “eyeball,” “fashionable,” and “manager.”)

In addition to his being a particularly clever wordsmith, Shakespeare’s word invention can be credited to the fact that the English language as a whole was in a major state of flux during the time that he was writing. Colonization and wars meant that English speakers were borrowing more and more words from other languages. read article