LB’s Poetry: “The Love I Know”

NOTE FROM LB: I started my showbiz life in the music business, as a drummer, and played in bands of every genre that existed at the time. The most difficult music for me to play was what then was called Country and Western, because the rhythm sounded like rock but wasn’t quite, and while the lyrics sounded like truth…

The Love I Know
by Larry Brody

Country music gives us the verities:

Love,

Betrayal,

And Death.

I live it all everyday, yet still I listen, as

Betrayal becomes the most beautiful

Possible reward, courtesy of a backbeat

And a mournful slide guitar, and

Death grows more desirable than

The most perfect lifetime, drowning

Betrayer and betrayed in a torrent of

Fiddles that could overpower any tide.

But country love pales beside the

Love I

Know.

No voice, no instrument,

No sequined yoke dress or hand painted

Pair of boots

Has ever been touched as I have,

By a woman whose truth makes

The certainties of Nashville and Branson

As false as an ember from Garth’s

Or Reba’s

Ceramic campfire log.


Larry Brody is the head dood at TVWriter™. Although the book whose cover you see above is for sale on Kindle, he is posting at least one poem a week here at TVWriter™ because, “As the Navajo Dog herself once pointed out to me, ‘Art has to be free. If you create it for money, you compromise your artistic vision by trying to please those who are paying. If you don’t accept money, you can be yourself. Like your art, you too are free.'”

Who is the Navajo Dog? Keep coming back and you’ll see.

TVWriter™ Don’t-Miss Posts of the Week – July 25th

In case you’ve missed what’s happening at TVWriter™, the most popular blog posts during the week ending yesterday were:

Diana Vacc sees OUTLANDER Ep. 13 “Dragonfly in Amber”

LB’s Poetry: “Kid Hollywood”

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

LB: Where Did THE FALL GUY Live?

Larry Brody: 10 Things That Help Me Keep on Keeping On

And our most visited permanent resource pages were:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

THE PEOPLE’S PILOT

The Logline

THE PEOPLE’S PILOT: About

The Teleplay

Major thanks to everyone for making this such a great week. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed. re-read what you loved, and, most importantly, come back for more soon

Peggy Bechko’s World: “Writers, save your readers from ‘boring'”

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by Peggy Bechko

Throw your hero off a cliff.

Yep, that’s the ticket. Think about it. Are you boring your reading audience with wonderful Mr. Nice Guy who may be a bit shy, but so darn good looking he’s irresistible?

Okay, he can be all that, but does he spend his days at the lake faithfully with his one true love and have nothing more exciting than crossing against a light to spice up his day?

Uh…. Boring.

Readers don’t want to follow a perfect hero or heroine as he or she goes about her day and everyone is subjected to every boring detail from tooth brushing to hailing a cab.

Really, if that’s your character you might sit down and have a talk with yourself about why that is.

So how about this. Your hero remains your hero but you toss in the woman he meets and falls in love with, a kick-ass martial arts champ, crack shot markswoman with a questionable past and a sarcastic wit. Now we’re talkin’! How would they work out their differences? How would he react to her, aside from loving her? What about her past, is that about to come back and bite them both?  I don’t know, do you have a clue?

A few elements like this and the reader doesn’t know from one page/moment to the next if the hero is going to have to jump off a cliff to save himself/her/ or out of total frustration.

Now that I’d like to read. Done well it would be a great page-turner or possibly the plot of a hit movie.

So, are you thinking like that, writing like that? No? Why not? We all have pasts and wounds we can draw on that we can present to our characters and really identify with.

If not, why not?

It’s scary out there for writers. They really need to plumb the depths and dig deep.

Unless…wait, there is no unless. It’s what a writer needs to do in order to hook readers. Sure, the fictional people are, well, fiction, but we put a little of ourselves into every character we create. Heroes, villains, it doesn’t matter.

Sinister? Painful? Dark? Yep, and we can throw in some sunshine and lollipops, but it originates within us. And we can’t make readers or movie goers feel if we can’t feel. Open up to yourself, admit your flaws and dark corners.

Dig deep, raise the bar for yourself and don’t stop exploring every emotion we all possess. Your readers will thank you and admire you for it.


Peggy Bechko is a TVWriter™ Contributing Editor. Learn more about her HERE. This post originally appeared on her sensationally helpful blog. Peggy’s new comic series, Planet of the Eggs, written and illustrated with Charlene Brash-Sorensen is available onKindle. And, while you’re at it, visit the Planet of the Eggs Facebook page

munchman: One-Sentence Reviews of July’s Premiering Series

dalek premiere

by munchman

Yer Friendly Neighborhood munchman promised LB he would review all the Summer 2016 shows – and then missed most of the June shows. (Or, rather, was sulking in my wi-fi challenged tent at a location I can’t divulge and didn’t get to see them. Don’t know how many I really “missed.”) But ole muncho is here now, so let’s get this over with started:

POWER

Power’s back and still nowhere near as enjoyable as the much more badly written Empire, proving that going over the top is always more fun.

BALLERS

Friends tell me I’d love this, but I’ve never been able to even give it a try cuz…Ballers?

VICE PRINCIPALS

Vice Principals tries like hell to give its characters all the energy, stupidity, and bad judgement of 8 year-olds and, unfortunately, succeeds.

DIFFICULT PEOPLE

Sorry, but I stopped watching this show halfway through the first season because it seems to me that if people are going to put on a show about my life I oughta get to at least star in it – or get paid…something!

SUITS

Suits is my ex’s favorite show, so ’nuff said, right?

MR. ROBOT

More of the same greatness we got last year featuring a protagonist I consider a kindred spirit except I smile less.

TYRANT

OMG!, it’s another series I just can’t get started on because I already deal with way too many tyrants for reals, kids, and definitely don’t need to put up with that shit when it’s just me, my VPN, and my iPad.

MARCO POLO

In the words of the Talking Heads, “same as it ever was,” even duller, dumber, and more historically inaccurate than DaVinci’s Demons (except I lurves DaVinci because…demons – and, hey, sex too).

DARK MATTER

Luvin’ on how well Dark Matter hides its low budget, but it screws up now and then by actually giving a character a positive worldview, for a few minutes anyway.

KILLJOYS

Killjoys is the same show as Dark Matter (I’ll bet there’s a point where we discover they share the same universe as well as the same night on Syfy), but it sometimes shows a genuine sense of humor that appeals to my smirkier side. (I said I don’t smile much, a few shows up. Didn’t say I don’t smirk.)

BOJACK HORSEMAN

This show is possibly my favorite TV series of all time because not only does it portray Hollywood perfectly, its hero has what really counts in showbiz – a genuine horse cock (even though we never get to see it). Oh, and because it’s my fave, I’m giving it a second sentence. Actually, this is for my ex to read but as long as you’re here, I’m cool with you sticking around: Sweetie, I’m sorry you hated my favorite show, but do you have to keep telling all your friends I’m just like Bojack except a whole lot – erm – smaller?

More to come in August – mehopes!

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munchalito

There Really Is (a Little Bit) of Poetry in TV Writing

Apropos of our Beloved Leader Larry Brody’s decision to post his wonderful, award-winning poetry here on TVWriter™, we present this enlightening interview with Jessi Klein, head writer of in, hip and trendy (and also fucking funny) Inside Amy Schumer.

Cuz truth to tell, every writer we know is at heart a genuine, 24-karat poet. It’s just that so many of us them are too embarrassed to come out.

by Alexandra Talty

Jessi KleinIn her hilarious essay collection You’ll Grow Out of It, Klein, head writer of Comedy Central’s Inside Amy Schumer and a former Saturday Night Live writer, muses on what it means to be a woman who doesn’t ever feel much like one.

How does writing a book compare to writing for television?

I love writing for TV. But in terms of the experience of sitting down and being able to write for as long as you want, it is incredibly freeing to write a book. When you write for TV or movies… This is going to sound so pretentious, but there is a little bit of poetry in it, in that you are trying to stick as much comedy and story in as small a space as you can—especially in the cases of SNL and Schumer, which are both sketch shows.

Was it difficult to sift through personal information for the book?

Clearly I think if you are writing any kind of book like this, you are an oversharer. I am kind of okay to reveal anything about myself. It is important to know where to draw the line between what I might share about myself and what I might share about someone who is not particularly interested in writing a book about themselves. So I am really careful when writing about my family. Ex-boyfriends? Less so.