Stream ‘Doctor Who’ Audio Dramas – Free!!!

If you’re a Doctor Who fan – of any Doctor and from any era of the show – you’ve probably heard of the various audio drama versions of the series put out by the company Big Finish, but you haven’t actually listened to any of them.

Now, thanks to Redditor electricmastro, who got it from dudles78 of Gallifrey Base you and I and everyone else who is interested can now stream the following Big Finish episodes legally via Spotify. (And also Google Play, but the links below are from Spotify).

Here’s the very helpful – oh, hell, to this TVWriter™ minion very exciting – post:

Dozens of stories have been put out for free, legal streaming on Spotify. Thanks to dudles78 on GallifreyBase for pointing this out:

Main Range:

  1. The Sirens of Time
  2. Phantasmagoria
  3. Whispers of Terror
  4. The Land of the Dead
  5. The Fearmonger
  6. The Marian Conspiracy
  7. The Genocide Machine
  8. Red Dawn
  9. The Spectre of Lanyon Moor
  10. Winter for the Adept
  11. The Apocalypse Element
  12. The Fires of Vulcan
  13. The Shadow of the Scourge
  14. The Holy Terror
  15. The Mutant Phase
  16. Storm Warning
  17. Sword of Orion
  18. The Stones of Venice
  19. Minuet in Hell
  20. Loups-Garoux
  21. Dust Breeding
  22. Bloodtide
  23. Project: Twilight
  24. The Eye of the Scorpion
  25. Colditz
  26. Primeval
  27. The One Doctor
  28. Invaders from Mars
  29. The Chimes of Midnight
  30. Seasons of Fear
  31. Embrace the Darkness
  32. The Time of the Daleks
  33. Neverland
  34. Spare Parts
  35. …ish
  36. The Rapture
  37. The Sandman
  38. The Church and the Crown
  39. Bang-Bang-a-Boom!
  40. Jubilee
  41. Nekromanteia
  42. The Dark Flame
  43. Doctor Who and the Pirates
  44. Creatures of Beauty
  45. Project: Lazarus
  46. Flip-Flop
  47. Omega
  48. Davros
  49. Master
  50. Zagreus

Special Releases:

UNIT: Dominion

The Davros Mission

Fourth Doctor Adventures:

 

  1. Innocence
  2. Purity
  3. Corruption
  4. Guilt

Cyberman:

1.1 Scorpius

1.2 Fear

1.3 Conversion

1.4 Telos

2.0 Cyberman 2

….

See the entire list on Reddit

Check out Big Finish

How to Write a Script for an Animated Show

YouTube is loaded with experts, some of whom actually know what they’re talking about. This week, we’ve found three YouTube videos about writing for animation that we think will genuinely help you if you’re a noob at the subject.

Are there conflicts between the approaches in these videos? You betcha. Because there really is no “right” way to write anything…just the way that will work for you.

Here they are:

The last one’s kind of our favorite because format, you know?

Maybe one of these days we’ll talk our Beloved Leader, Larry Brody, into making his own video on the subject. Word is that he’s had some real winners in that arena. 

So You Want to Make a Web Series – Step 1

Writing it
by Bri Castellini

Congratulations! You’ve decided to enter the exciting and stressful world of independent web series! It’s not going to be easy, but it will almost certainly be worth it.

Naturally, the first step in creating a web series is writing the script. Maybe you already have an idea, or maybe you have a longer-form script you want to adapt. Maybe you aren’t sure but just really like the idea of spamming your friends and family with week after week of YouTube links. In any case, let’s talk development, and what you need to remember when making the plunge.

Remember that your audience is young. Most web series audiences are going to be between 14-30. That doesn’t preclude writing more mature stories about adults with adult problems, but it does mean your show should be relatable across generations.

You also have to remember to respect the medium. You can’t just film a TV pilot and expect it to succeed as a web series. You almost certainly don’t have the money, and there’s nothing worse than watching 30-40 minutes of a low-budget film project to then discover it’s only the pilot.

Plus, it’s not like there isn’t a wealth of good TV anymore. Give them something new. This could mean making the medium itself a part of the story — the massive success of vlog and found-footage series demonstrates how audiences have an appetite for new storytelling formats. This can also mean a license to tell a more intimate story with fewer characters, allowing you to double down on their development.

Finally, remember to embrace diversity. Hollywood can get away with its straight white male ivory tower because it’s detached from its audience, but you aren’t. You are directly posting and marketing your content on sites that are built on engagement and viewer feedback.

I’m not advocating for tokenism (where you insert a minority character for the sake of diversity), obviously, but if your show has a narrow traditional perspective, you should ask yourself what you’re really contributing to the conversation. Many people seek out web series explicitly because traditional forms of media aren’t giving them the representation they need; by writing for those communities, you can tap into a passionate audience that will embrace you

Now, with all that in mind, if you don’t already have a script, to adapt or otherwise, it’s time to get brainstorming.

Aside from general brainstorming methods that I’m sure have be written about to death at this point, the thing about making a web series is that, more than likely, you’re on your own. You’ll have little to no money, so the actual resources to make the series a reality will be limited as well. As such, a good brainstorming tool is making a list of all the things you have available to you: locations, cast and crew, equipment, props, wardrobe, etc.

Made your list? Good. Now forget about it for the moment. The best thing you can do in a web series script is to write the story you want to tell, production and audience demographics be damned. The only reason I made two seasons of my TVWriter™-approved series is because I was naive and had no idea what I was doing at first!

Writing within your means is all well and good, but you’d be surprised by what you can come up with if you ask around. It’s incredibly easy at the indie level to talk yourself out of stories or ideas because they’re “too hard” or “not universal enough,” but don’t let yourself fall into that mind trap. At the end of the day, you’re a storyteller. So tell your story and worry about the rest later.

That’s it for this column! Now stop reading and go write, and when you’re done, come back, because we are far from done. In the next few columns we’ll explore pre-production, the bare necessities of a no-budget film crew, casting, the full time job that is crowdfunding, the constant panic of production, endless post-production, and promotion.

OK, so not a web series – but a wonderful series of webs found at dreamstime.com

Bri Castellini is an award-winning filmmaker and the Community Liaison at Stareable, a hub for web series. Check out www.stareable.com to find and read reviews of thousands of web series, all in one place. For more great articles about the craft of web series, visit the Stareable blog.

And, before we forget, learn more about Bri’s video work HERE

Happy Valentine’s Day from TVWriter™!

©LanierPrintables – https://www.etsy.com/listing/266413235/love-card-printable-valentines-day-card

Binge-Writing Together Ain’t Bad Either!

Why You Need a Mentor

Extremely valuable advice for anyone embarking on a new career. Yep, even writers…honest!

by Eric Ravenscraft

Having a mentor is a great way to gain experience and knowledge that’s not easy to gain from formal education. Ironically, getting the most out of your mentor doesn’t come with a handbook. So we wrote one.

 Of course, you may wonder why you need a mentor at all. Simple! You don’t know everything. Sorry rebellious youth. The truth is that most people who are just starting out don’t really know how to get what they want and even fewer know how to ask for it. Finding a mentor in the field you want to pursue is a great way to learn the necessary skills and career paths you need.

Choosing the right mentor is the most important part of getting the most from one. A good mentor can teach you how to reach the goals you’ve set for yourself. So first, ask yourself what you want to do. Want to write a book? Start a business? Learn to code? The best mentor will be one who knows how to do what you want to accomplish (and, ideally, has done it successfully before).

Of course, what you want to accomplish doesn’t have to be limited solely to a job. Being a manager is something many people can do. Being a good manager is another thing entirely. A good mentor shouldn’t just be one that knows more than you, but one that appeals to you. Try to imagine yourself in the position they’re in. If that’s an idea you’re okay with, move forward. If you dread the idea of becoming the type of person they are, keep looking. Becoming successful and being miserable aren’t intrinsically linked….

Read it all at Lifehacker